Shoulder Bursitis

A client recent asked me if there’s a yoga pose that could assist with his bursitis in the shoulder. I suggested the following. If you have any other ideas, please comment.

Practice the following arm poses: 1) Cow Face Arms, 2) Eagle Pose –Focus on Eagle Arms, 3) Hands Bound Behind Back Pose (is there a name for this?).

Directions for Pose 3:  Stand tall and simply interlace hands behind back. Focus on drawing shoulders down and hands slightly away from body.

If you’re unsure about 1 & 2, check out this link for pictures —http://www.yogajournal.com/poses/finder/anatomical_focus/shoulders

Avoid taking arms overhead right now in poses such as Warrior I, Chair Pose (Utkatasana), Urdhva Hastasana, etc. You can always modify these poses by leaving the arms along side of the body, or interlacing hands behind back.

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5 responses to this post.

  1. More than the type of pose I would recommend doing hot classes. The heat will penetrate the shoulder, while the poses will build strength. Bikram poses are more therapeutic. -lightf http://www.theashramyoga.com.

    Reply

  2. Excellent point! I fully agree the heat is more soothing for the shoulder and a safer environment for most injuries. Unfortunately, the student referenced does not have access to a heated practice. Thanks again for commenting!

    Reply

  3. Cure of tendon injuries is essentially practical. Using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications coupled with Physical Therapy, rest, orthotics or braces, and moderate return to workout is a common therapy.

    Reply

  4. Posted by Bobbi on June 19, 2011 at 9:26 pm

    Cure of tendon injuries is essentially practical. Using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications coupled with Physical Therapy, rest, orthotics or braces, and moderate return to workout is a common therapy. An acronym used to list the remedial treatments in fixing tendinitis is “RICE”: Rest, Ice, Compress, and Elevate. Resting assists in the prevention of further injury to the tendon. Ice is effective at soothing pain, restricting too much swelling, and stimulating blood circulation after the fact. Compression and elevation both perform similarly to ice in their ability to restrict excessive, unnecessary inflammation.Initial recovery is commonly within 2 to 3 days and full recuperation is within 4 to 6 week.Visit my site to learn more about bursitis treatment http://tendlite.com/bursitis-treatment

    Reply

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